Synthroid vs Levothyroxine: Are these Medications Interchangeable?

Even though Synthroid and Levothyroxine contain the same active ingredient, they may not be tolerated equally among all patients.

This means that certain patients do better on one medication compared to the other!

Learn how to identify if you are taking the right type of medication and when to consider switching in this post:

More...

Generic Levothyroxine vs Brand name Synthroid

The most common medication used to treat hypothyroidism is Levothyroxine.

Levothyroxine is considered a "generic" version of the thyroid medication Synthroid.

But is there a difference and does it actually matter?

The answer is yes, there may actually be a difference despite these medications being almost exactly the same.

Generic medications are usually created after a brand name medication goes off patent.

Other pharmaceutical companies can then come in and make a "me too" version of the medication and they often sell it for cheaper than the original.

In this case, we have Levothyroxine which is the generic and Synthroid which is the brand name medication.

But despite both of these medications having the exact same ACTIVE ingredient (thyroxine) (1), they are not the EXACT same.

And even though the difference is not big, it may actually matter to certain people (especially those who are sensitive).

The active thyroid hormone and the active ingredient in both medications is the thyroid hormone Thyroxine.

Thyroxine is the bio-identical pharmaceutical version of the T4 thyroid hormone that your body produces naturally.

Both Synthroid and Levothyroxine contain this active ingredient.

So we know that the difference between these medications probably has little to do with the active ingredient and more to do with the inactive ingredients.

Inactive ingredients are known as fillers, dyes, and binders which help hold the active medication in place.

Download my Free Resources:

Foods to Avoid if you have Thyroid Problems: 

I've found that these 10 foods cause the most problems for thyroid patients. Learn which foods you should absolutely be avoiding if you have thyroid disease of any type. 

The Complete List of Thyroid Lab Tests:

This list includes optimal ranges, normal ranges, and the complete list of tests you need to diagnose thyroid hypothyroidism correctly!

Download more free resources on this page

All pharmaceutical medications have inactive ingredients and these ingredients can help delay the absorption of medications, protect the ingredients from damage in the intestinal tract and so on.

The problem is that some of these medications contain ingredients that may actually cause negative symptoms and reactions in certain sensitive patients (2).

It is this small difference that may account for the difference in bioequivalence seen between generic and brand-name levothyroxine in some studies (3). 

synthroid vs levothyroxine in patients

This study showed that using Synthroid resulted in a more rapid rise in total serum triiodothyronine and a higher peak serum T3 when compared to other T4 only products.

And even though this result didn't reach statistical significance, it may still be important for certain people.

Remember that T3 is the most active and potent form of thyroid hormone in your body (4).

So even small changes to T3 may have a big impact on certain individuals.

It may be small differences such as this which result in improvement when switching from one medication to the other, even though technically they are the "same thing".

And this isn't the only study to show a difference between these medications.

Another study, which evaluated children with hypothyroidism, showed that Synthroid resulted in a significantly lower TSH when compared to generic LT4 medication replacement therapy (5).

What is interesting is that the people who seemed to be sensitive to the difference were only patients with certain types of hypothyroidism (congenital hypothyroidism in this case).

What this tells us is that not all patients are equally responsive to all types of thyroid medications (which shouldn't come as a surprise).

This is a potentially big issue because most physicians, when prescribing medications, often recommend the cheaper generic alternatives to the name brand medications.

To further complicate this, some pharmacists can even alter medications given to patients for insurance and cost purposes.

While this may be a strategy for saving money it may not be the best strategy when it comes to symptomatic management of patients with hypothyroidism!

When to Consider Switching Thyroid Medications

Does this mean that you need to run out and try to change your thyroid medication from Synthroid to Levothyroxine or vice versa?

Not necessarily, but it never hurts to be informed and educated on the topic.

Instead of jumping to changing your medication it may be a good idea to sit down and evaluate your current situation.

If, for instance, you are currently taking Levothyroxine and you are having trouble with hypothyroid symptoms (such as fatigue, weight gain, cold intolerance and so on) then it may be worth considering altering your medication.

There are also other conditions which may cause you to consider altering your medication and I've included a list below:

  • #1. If you are simply not responding to your current medication
  • #2. If you have a "normal" TSH but still remain symptomatic
  • #3. If you suspect absorption issues
  • #4. If you suspect a reaction to inactive fillers/binders
  • #5. If cost is a potential issue for you
  • #6. If you have congenital hypothyroidism or if you have had your thyroid removed or destroyed with radioactive iodine

If you fall into any of these categories then you may want to consider changing from whichever medication you are currently taking to the other.

So if you fit the criteria on the list and you are taking 100mcg of Levothyroxine then you would want to switch to 100mcg of Synthroid.

T3 conversion booster results

You would then want to make sure that you check your thyroid lab tests after about 6 weeks to ensure that you did well with the transition.

Most physicians should not give you any trouble in making this type of switch, but they may give you trouble if you asked to be switched from Synthroid to another medication like Armour thyroid.

Cost Difference Between Synthroid & Levothyroxine, Tirosint & Levoxyl

Another factor to consider is the cost of the various forms of T4 medications.

Unfortunately, the cheapest medications tend to be Synthroid and Levothyroxine. 

The more expensive medications (which may be necessary for some people) tend to be upwards of $30 per month all the way up to $130 per month in the case of Tirosint. 

You can see a comparison chart below: 

average prices of thyroxines

It's important to remember that the cost of medications often depends on which pharmacy you go to. 

Some pharmacies are just inherently more expensive than other pharmacies, even for the same medication. 

Also, in some cases, it may be cheaper to pay the "cash price" for medications instead of your insurance co-pay. 

Below you will find the average cost of a 30-day supply of 100mcg of each of the Thyroxine medications. 

The average cost of Levothyroxine & Synthroid 30-day supply:

Synthroid and Levothyroxine tend to be the same price, but often your insurance may cover one and not the other. 

If you fall into this category then you can usually pay the "cash price" and still pay the same total price. 

30 day price of Levothyroxine and Synthroid

The average cost of Tirosint 30-day supply:

Tirosint is the most expensive T4 only thyroid medication coming in at around $130 per month for the 100mcg dose. 

Even though Tirosint is more expensive than other medications there are some coupon options that you can use to help reduce the cost. 

30 day cost of Tirosint thyroid medication

The average cost of Levoxyl 30-day supply:

Levoxyl is another T4 only thyroid medication which is slightly more expensive when compared to Levothyroxine but cheaper than Tirosint. 

30 day price of levoxyl

Each of these thyroid medications falls into the class of "Thyroxines" which means they all contain T4. 

Even though they all contain the same medication, you may find that you do better on one versus the other. 

Because of this, you may need to "play around" with which medication you are using. 

What to do if Synthroid & Levothyroxine Aren't Working

In some situations, you may find that switching from Synthroid to Levothyroxine (or vice versa) still doesn't help remove all of your symptoms.

What are you supposed to do if you fall into this situation?

First is to not lose hope or faith!

You still have many options worth considering.

I've created a list of the next steps you'll want to consider if you fall into this category:

  • #1. Try 50mcg Tablet of Levothyroxine/Synthroid - The 50mcg tablet has the fewest amount of inactive binders and fillers compared to other dosages. If you are taking 100mcg of Synthroid you may find benefit taking 2, 50mcg tablets instead of 1, 100mcg tablet.
  • #2. Consider switching from Levothyroxine/Synthroid to Tirosint - Tirosint is a cleaner thyroid medication with only 4 ingredients (3 of which are inactive ingredients). This should be compared to Levothyroxine/Synthroid which contain 10+ inactive ingredients.
  • #3. Consider altering the time of day that you take your medication - Some individuals may find significant improvement in taking their medication in the evening compared to the morning. Some studies show people who take thyroid medication at night (6) have higher free thyroid hormone concentration in the serum.
  • #4. Consider looking into medications that contain T3 (triiodothyronine) such as NDT (Armour Thyroid, WP thyroid, and Nature-Throid) - These medications may be preferred in individuals who have thyroid conversion issues and in those who still remain symptomatic despite normal thyroid lab tests.

What is the Difference Between Synthroid/Levothyroxine & Liothyronine?

Synthroid and Levothyroxine are both considered T4 only thyroid medications which means that they contain the bio-identical thyroid hormone Thyroxine.

Liothyronine, on the other hand, contains the most potent thyroid hormone which is known as T3 or triiodothyronine.

T3 is about 3-4 times more powerful than T4 (depending on which study you look at).

T3 is available in two medications: Liothyronine (generic) and Cytomel (brand-name).

Many physicians and Doctors are hesitant to prescribe T3 due to the relatively short half-life of T3 when compared to T4.

In addition, because T3 is more potent than T4, patients who use T3 tend to have more side effects.

But these are not reasons to completely avoid this medication!

Liothyronine may be a superior medication when it comes to weight loss and may be necessary for certain individuals.

You can learn more about T3 in this post.

Final Thoughts

The bottom line?

There is a potential difference between Levothyroxine and Synthroid but the difference is probably not noticeable for most people.

If you are currently taking one or the other and you are doing well (meaning you are not symptomatic) then you probably don't need to worry about changing up your medication regimen.

If, on the other hand, you are taking one and NOT experiencing relief in your symptoms then the information in this post may be especially relevant for you.

In this case, you may find relief in simply switching from name brand to generic or vice versa.

Now I want to hear from you:

Are you currently taking Synthroid or Levothyroxine?

Are they working for you?

Are you still symptomatic despite normal thyroid lab tests?

Has switching medications helped you feel better?

Leave your comments below!

References (Click to Expand)

This post was most recently updated on March 2nd, 2019

Dr. Westin Childs

Dr. Westin Childs is a Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine. He provides well-researched actionable information about hormone-related disorders and formulates supplements to treat these disorders.He is trained in Internal Medicine, Functional Medicine, and Integrative Medicine. His focus is on managing thyroid disorders, weight loss resistance, and other sex hormone imbalances.You can read more about his own personal journey here.

65 thoughts on “Synthroid vs Levothyroxine: Are these Medications Interchangeable?”

  1. At age 19 I was diagnosed with hyperthyroidism. I had my thyroid removed via radioactive iodine. I was unable to take the generic levothyroxine-so I’ve been on Synthroid ever since. I’m now 59. I had taken the same dose forever;.150mg. Over the last year, the Thyroid levels were low, then now too high then low again. I’m trying the generic for the first time, in obviously a long time. I’ve also been told that my Free T-3 is low. I’m now going to be trying your T3 Conversion booster. My Dr.(who is in NO way a natural remedy Dr. has recommended Potassium Iodide. I’m trying your product first.
    My eyes have been bothering me and I’ve experienced weight gain.

    • Hi Terri,

      That definitely seems like a reasonable approach! There is iodine in the T3 conversion booster, so you will be getting it either way. Good luck and keep us updated on your progress.

  2. I’ve been on Synthroid for 13 years. I started on it, insurance forced me to use the generic levothyroxine, and my hair began falling out. Lots of hair, not just a bit more. So I switched back to Synthroid. Now my new insurance co says it won’t pay for the non-generic and won’t take my doctor’s word for it. I’m at my wit’s end! How do I get the meds I need covered? Non-generic Synthroid is $45/month!

    • Hi Mini,

      Unfortunately, I don’t have any tips or tricks to help with the insurance side of things. Perhaps someone else reading this might know something?

      You might be able to try the cash price via goodrx.com which tends to be cheap with a coupon.

    • I have been using Synthroid for the last 18 years. Today I got my refill and I now paying 87.00 instead of the 30.00 in February. I cannot use the generic I did that and had to switch back to Synthroid. I feel your frustration and I am disgusted with the insurance company.

    • If your Doctor writes on the script, “Synthroid Only”, then Medicare/Medicade and most private Insurance Co.’s should cover a prescription of the brand name, Synthroid. I had the same problem up until just a few years ago when I learned this tip.

  3. I was taking 100mcg Synthroid then switched to generic for cost reasons and I have a rash on my face. Is this common or possible rash may be from something else? Ever hear of generic causing pimples/ break out? My skin for 62 years has never broke out unless I’ve had reaction to medications

  4. Thank you for a clear description. For the past couple decades I have taken Synthroid. But I have a new doctor and she prescribed Levothyroxine. It cost one half what the Synthroid pills cost. I will begin taking it because I suspect it will not be significant difference for me since I suspect the other ingredients won’t effect me much. I really appreciate your taking time to explain. If there is a big difference, I will be sure to write about it here. I will also be on the lookout for reactions like the rash mentioned above.

  5. Hello Dr. Childs. At the end of July 2016 I had the radiation iodine for Grave’s disease. Since that time I have been taking Levothyroxine. After each 2 month blood test, my lab numbers are in the red. My dr has tried changing my dosages from 50mcg to 25 mcg, from taking 1 tablet 7 days a week in 50mcg and later told to cut the tabs in half and take 25mcg for 7 days per week.This is what the schedule has been since 07/2016:
    50mcg = 1 tablet each day (all taken before breakfast)
    After lab test – 50mcg = 1 tablet for 5 days per week
    After lab test – 50mcg = 1 tablet for 3 days per week
    After lab test – 25mcg = 1 tablet for 7 days per week
    After lab test – 25mcg = 1 tablet for 5 days per week
    After lab test – 25mcg = 1 tablet for 3 days per week
    After lab test – 25mcg = 1 tablet for 4 days per week
    And now, after this last test (06/2018)? She is prescribing 50mcg for 7 days a week (again), (this is what I originally started at in 2016).

    I feel like I am stuck in a loop. If my next labs are still out of balance after two years I think I may have to change doctors. What are your thoughts regarding the changes in Levothyroxine dosages and is it safe to cut the tablets in half and to skip days each week going from 7/wk to 5/wk to 3/wk and then up to 4/wk, etc?

    • Hi Cindy,

      Unfortunately, there is no way of knowing without the lab test values, reference ranges and so on. There isn’t enough information presented here for me to say.

  6. I have Hashimoto’s Disease and have been taking 100mcg of levothyroxine for many years. I switched insurance companies and now have been taking synthroid, the same dosage, for many months. I am now hyperthyroid again. Could it be the switch from generic to brand medication that is causing this?

    • Hi Ann,

      It’s possible but it may just be related to other factors as well such as a change in the demand for thyroid hormone in your body.

  7. I had a total thyroidectomy 3/28/18 and have been on 100mcg of Levothyroxine.

    I have been SO TIRED aka sleepy. This is not how I want to live the rest of my life!!! 57 years old I am.

    My Endocronoligist just prescribed me the brand name Synthroid, but said it won’t make a difference.

    “I need to see my PCD for my tiredness issue” per her.

    This started AFTER my thyroid was removed!

    Thank you for this informative article. If switching these 2 drugs doesn’t work, I guess I need to re-read your article &/or see a new Endocronoligist.

  8. Ok, I too switched to generic due to insurance reasons…
    This happened about 4 years ago and I remember side effects of fatigue and hair loss, etc. Now, it’s happened again and I wish insurance companies would understand there is a percentage this generic does not work for!! I had a battery of tests today after feeling dizzy and fatigue and I told my doctor I’m certain it is this switch.

    • Hi Lisa,

      If you can afford it you can pay the cash price for Synthroid which is usually around $20-30 per month. You don’t have to use whatever medication your insurance recommends and many drugs are insanely cheap with or without insurance. Most generic medications can be purchased for $4 with or without insurance.

  9. I was switched from synthroid to LEVOTHYROXINE without my knowledge. I have been on synthroid for five years and LEVOTHYROXINE for the past month. I have been so sick for the past month and couldn’t figure out why. I should note I had a major surgery April 30th and thought this maybe had something to do with my illness. I had an “ah ha” moment yesterday and checked my pill bottle label. My new doctor just prescribed me the LEVOTHYROXINE without asking or telling me of the change. I have Severe migraines, chills, sweating, chest pain, nausea, ear pain and more.

    • Hi Heather,

      Unfortunately, most physicians and pharmacists believe that the medications are interchangeable which leads to situations such as yours.

  10. Hello! I have been on levothyroxine 75mcg for about ten years now and have Hashimotos. Over the last year, my TSH has been fluctuating between low and high. This has caused symptoms of both hypo and hyper at times. My doctor just switched me to Levoxyl 75mcg. She said the dosage with the generic can be inconsistent and that Levoxyl is more stable. I’m sensitive to medication in general but I’m really hoping the medicine change doesn’t cause any side effects and I’m nervous about the change. I’ve had instances in the past where I’d miss my levothyroxine dose only by a few hours and would get anxiety, sweats etc. It was really odd. Here’s hoping Levoxyl doesn’t cause that. There shouldn’t be a “withdrawal” just by switching to the name brand right?

    • Hi Danny,

      The medications are not considered to be bioequivalent so you may experience symptoms when switching.

  11. Hi…Just DON’T STOP taking your thyroid med like I did. I felt like tearing my face off. Really strange, but was so frustrated. Took about a year to get better and now I’m on Synthroid.

  12. Interesting article, thank you. My Hashimoto’s experience has been a rough one. My levels were all within normal limits but my PCP was still suspecting thyroid problems due to my symptoms. He checked my thyroid peroxidase and it was high, almost 800. I went to an endocrinologist who titrated my Levothyroxine to 100mcg. It took awhile but I finally started feeling better. I feel my best when my TSH levels are on the hyperthyroid end of the scale. I switched insurance so had to switch doctors and also began down the infertility journey. The new doctor recommended the brand Synthroid, saying it is superior to the generic. Unfortunately my fatigue returned and my TSH levels went up 2 points. She then increased it to 112 mcg. It’s too early to tell, but I find 112 to be such an odd dose. I may ask her about switching to 2 50mcg per day after reading your article, so thank you. I’m also going to try taking it at night instead of first thing in the morning. Thanks again!

  13. Hi,
    I took L-Thyroxine Tabs 75mcg for 20 years with no problem.
    When I switched to Synthroid Tabs 75mcg a month ago and shortly after had difficulty controlling my Blood sugar ( I am on the Pod) and experienced episodes of rapid Heartbeat.
    Is there a correlation?
    Thanks
    Iris

  14. Hi, I have lost my taste and smell after a total thyroidectomy May 2, 2018. Along with that I have another smell that permeates my being and goes along with eating a lot of different foods. I space out the timing of taking the Levoxyl from my other meds leaving about 6 or 7 hours between. I was first on Levothyroxine 175 mcg a day. now Levoxyl 175. I have cut the omeprazole in half keeping it the furthest away from the thyroid meds but nothing has changed. I have found tuna and seafood, onions, some fruit like strawberries as well as beef all evoke the bad taste and smell that is nauseating. I can get some salt taste and some sweet but that’s about all. I actually gained 5 lbs without hardly eating. The smell is in my nose and I feel like I smell like this smell. No smell with perfumes, etc. Got any ideas? would love to solve this problem! Thanks for your time!

  15. In January, 2018 I switched from Synthroid, same dosage for 22 years. I switched to the generic and about 5 weeks ago I started having pain in my arms and shoulder. I was also having fatigue and my doctor changed my dosage, after my test was low. After the change in dosage, my fatigue got better, but the pain is still in my arms. My primary doctor of many years would not change me the generic and she retired and my new doctor switched me to generic, because my new insurance price for synthroid was expensive. I see now why she did not want me to switch and I wish I had not switched. I may return to synthroid.

    • Hi Shirley,

      It’s unusual that switching makes a difference but it’s certainly true in a subgroup of people, you seem to be in that group!

  16. I am 55 years old and hypothyroidism runs in my family. I was prescribed Synthroid brand until the generic Levothyroxine became available (and insurance strongly pushed generics). My bloodwork results had always come back within tolerance until a few months after beginning the generics. My family doctor varied my generic dosage to dial in the test results, however, my reaction was wildly unpredictable. The test swung over and under the norm for over 2 months. Time to call in the highly-paid Endocrinologist. She had seen similar cases and immediately put me back on the Synthroid brand. My bloodwork came back to normal. My understanding of the issue is that the quality of generics is not monitored closely enough and some pharmacies mix the generic pills coming from the various manufacturers/batches (which increases the potential for volatility in the pills dispensed). I overpaid for useless generic prescriptions & doctors/specialists visits to “experiment” with generics. Lesson learned: Should have stayed on the brand name. I hope this story helps somebody get to the solution faster. DEMAND SYNTHROID BRAND NAME if the use of the generic drugs causes fluctuation in your blood test results.
    Money Savings Tip: The makers of Synthroid offer coupons on their website. It may reduce your insurance copay (worked for me).
    Full disclosure: I do not work for nor receive compensation from the pharmaceutical company.

  17. I’ve been on a generic thyroid drug for years now. Levoxyl and Levothyroxine (not sure when or why I switched from one to the other). My thyroid tests always show me in the normal range. However, I have been experiencing fatigue, super itchy skin, and weight gain over the last year (or so!) and my doctor is finally recommending a change, from Levothyroxine to the brand name Synthroid – same dose. Says I should notice a difference in about a week and if not, I guess we’ll come up with a different plan. I’m open to anything because the fatigue and itching are really driving me crazy. Very surprised this is needed after years of being on the same meds. The doctor has done every blood test under the sun but there doesn’t seem to be anything else wrong me with 🙂

  18. I have been taking 75 generic levothyroxine and have noticed I am lethargic. My recent test showed I was near 3 TSH which is .7 higher than last year. The doctor upped my dosage to 88 and switched me to Synthroid. I noticed immediately that my thyroid gland was kind of sensitive, where it felt more comfortable by putting some pressure on it with my hand at times. On the new medication my lethargy had subsided and I felt like doing stuff again, however wasn’t sure if I felt fully normal yet and my 2nd test after 6 weeks shows TSH over 5. I have improved but I can’t tell, is synthroid a problem and I should go back to generic Levothyroxine on a higher dose, or was the generic not working right all along and now synthroid is working but I need a still higher dose? not sure what I should think… waiting for Doctor to weigh in on this.

  19. I had my thyroid removed 10 yrs. ago. Cancer, but no treatment necessary. I have taken 112 mcg of levothyroxine only. Mylan was backordered and I have been given levoxyl and then another company’s levothyroxine. I’m having very hard side effects. Headache, shakes,an hour after taking it. I’ve asked for synthroid. I’ve had major surgery and I have lost 25 lbs. Can this affect the dose I should take? Seeing my doctor next week,but wouldn’t mind your opinion. Regards.

  20. I switched from Levothyroxine to synthroid a month and a half ago and since switching my vertigo has improved, I have lost 8 lbs, and I dont have so many aches and pains. I was currently on Levothyroxine for 8 years. I switched! I was told that the difference between the 2 drugs was the manufacturers. The levothyroxine supposedly is manufactured by several different companies and the synthroid is always made by the same manufacturer.

    • Hi Penny,

      Thanks for sharing and I’m glad you are feeling better! And you are correct in that multiple manufacturers are involved in producing levothyroxine.

  21. Hello
    Thank you so much for this information. It is very valuable. I got my thyroid removed in August 2018. I was put on Levothyroxine (75) to begin with. After 2 weeks my doc increased this to 100. I am having daily symptoms of tingling, numbness and burning (arms, face and legs). My TSH level was very high (40) so the Doctor increased my dose to 150 and it is now <5. Symptoms were still the same so I switched to Synthroid 2 weeks ago with no improvement. I am also taking calcitriol and calcium and with this my calcium levels are normal. Based on your experience what you think the issue could be, and what I might try next.

    Thank you so much, Bernie

  22. Hi,I’ve been on the generic brand (started at 50 now it’s 75)for a few years.Last blood test I had in April of this year came back normal yet I still suffer from fatigue,hair loss,dry skin,depression,cold intolerance-just to name a few!I recently seen my doctor and told her this but she didn’t mention anything about trying the brand name.I had another blood test done yesterday,so we shall see what that says!

  23. I had a nodule (benign) removed in August 2016, but since no part of my thyroid was removed, my levels looked OK. For years though I have experienced the symptoms of hypo….creeping weight gain or inability to lose weight, major fatigue, hair loss, etc. Doctor kept saying my labs looked ok. Finally, the endocrinologist started me on the generic at a dose of 50 and said I would feel better in about a week. At this time, my T4 was borderline low and he said it had been trending downwards over the years. The 3rd week on this medicine, I felt great…..felt like I actually lost a little weight and had more energy! The 4th week and thereafter (I’ve been on it a total of 9 weeks), I’ve experienced worse symptoms than when I began the medicine. Very rapid weight gain (almost 2 sizes in 5 weeks), horrible fatigue, dry hair that is falling out, dry skin, constipation, etc. Just did a round of labs. My T3 and T4 are now normal, but now my TSH was low. So, the doctor lowered my dose to 25 and switched me from the generic to the brand name, Synthroid. How soon should I notice a difference? Also, if symptoms are better does that mean my numbers should be ok? I just find it odd that I’ve suffered from the symptoms of hypo for so many years but my labs were always within range.

  24. Very useful article, thanks. I had half my thyroid gland removed due to hashimotos about 25 years ago. Have been on Levothyroxine since. About 4 years ago my symptoms started to get worse and since then life has been miserable. I’m hot/cold, no energy, can’t sleep, tingling in limbs etc, bloods are “normal”. Thinking about switching meds, so very helpful info.

    • Hi Audrey,

      Glad you found it helpful! Switching medications is certainly worth a shot, especially if you aren’t feeling well. Switching to a completely different medication such as Tirosint may also potentially be helpful.

  25. Which has more significant active ingredients? Synthroid name brand or Levothyroxine generic? I believe I’m allergic to acacia, lactose or corn starch (or a combination). My doctor switched me to Levothyroxine and I broke out in hives on my face and feel bloated. My low carb- healthy eating lifestyle results stalled. I would like to identify the drug with the least amount of additives.

  26. I unfortunately took a 30 day dose of levothyroxine which caused 40% necrosis of my liver. It led me to fulminate liver failure in 2 months. Where I had a full liver transplant at 30 yrs old. Which sparked the FDA recall recently. Tampa General Hospital said it was crazy how fast I went from the levothyroxine. Any attorneys working on the recall from China?

  27. I’m starting the brand name Synthroid tomorrow. I’m hoping the extreme fatigue, heat intolerance, dry skin, and dry hair subside. Oh yeah, the brain fog too. I was recently diagnosed with Hashimoto’s. TPO antibodies were 417. Was originally diagnosed with hypothyroidism in 2006. Have been consistently taking Levothyroxine since 2012. Was on 75 mcg and then was changed to 125mcg when my TSH got up to 11. I just want to feel better. It’s so frustrating trying to find a regimen to feel better.

    • Hi Barbara,

      It sounds as if your current set of symptoms may be related to hyperthyroidism which could be from your Hashimoto’s or from taking an excessively high dose of thyroid medication. You should have your labs tested to see where you sit.

  28. [email protected]

    Hi, I have been on Levothyroxine for 10 years. We moved and I had to get a new doctor and bloodwork done. They put me on Synthroid and Armour Thyroid. On my third week…having a stiff neck and headache now itching on chest. I called the doctors office and they told me to not take any medication for one day then the next day I only take the Armour and not take Synthroid to see if that helps. How do I know if it’s the Synthroid or the Armour that’s causing this?

  29. I had thyroid cancer in 2000. I was on Synthroid 88mg& 25 Cytomel. Went to a new doctor switch to Armour 1.5. Starting losing weight and feeling better . My regular doctor didn’t like I switch to Armour. So she switched me back to Synthroid 125. I’m hoping that Synthroid makes me feel as good as I have been. Is there any problems with taking Armour, was told that the dose might not be the same every time. Just wondering which one I needed to be on. Thank you for your help.

  30. I was having shoulder and hip pain for a couple of years so my doctor suggested I take Synthroid instead of the generic brand I was taking and within no time I was pain free and have been ever since. I think of all the ibuprofen I took dealing with this chronic pain and it infuriates me. Hope this helps someone.

  31. Hi, I have been suffering from sever hair loss(I have lost about 2/3’s of my hair), being extremely cold, sensitivity to cold, dry brittle hair, dry skin to name a few things. My mom and both my sisters suffer from hypothyroidism and Hashimoto’s. My doctor checked my TSH and it was 2.7 due to it bring in the normal range he will not run any further test or check me for Hashimoto’s. I am wanting to know if you know of any doctor’s in Las Vegas that can help me to see if I have a thyroid issue or carry the Hashimoto’s gene?

Leave a Comment

Item added to cart.
0 items - $0.00